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Copyright 2017  West Berkeley Design Loop

From Carrie Dovzak, FD 1 CERT District Coordinator:

 

Hi Neighbors,

Two weeks ago I had a tour of the Bayer facilities with Jenn Cogley, the Deputy Director of Community Relations there. I wanted to pass on this updated information ( see below) that she sent to me that explains the various sirens you may hear coming from the Bayer property.

 

When my daughter was little I often heard the 'first Wednesday' siren, and was reminded of it when I was home sick with the flu a few weeks ago.  We have so many new working parents in the neighborhood whom have probably never heard it...

I had a great discussion with Jenn about our neighborhood and CERT, and we also brainstormed on some community events that we want to get going. Stay tuned! In the meantime - share this flyer with your family, friends and neighbors.

 

Again - I am looking forward to talking to CERT groups and organized Block groups in our Fire District. Let me know if you'd like me to attend one of your neighborhood meetings and talk about CERT.

Download Bayer PDF version

Sirens at Bayer in Berkeley

What they mean, what to do

As a manufacturing facility, Bayer HealthCare’s Berkeley site is required to maintain emergency warning systems,

primarily for the purpose of monitoring the production of our biopharmaceutical treatments for hemophilia A. This

fact sheet explains Bayer’s warning systems that may be heard beyond our gates.

1. Ammonia Siren—Take Shelter Inside!

Ammonia refrigeration is the most efficient and environmentally sound refrigeration technique used globally, and

it is the primary refrigeration technique used at Bayer’s Berkeley site. Ammonia can pose significant health risks

if inhaled in the event of a sizeable accidental release. Under typical East Bay weather conditions, ammonia generally

will not travel at unsafe levels more than . to . mile from the site’s boundaries—along Seventh Street between Dwight

Way and Grayson Street. Our refrigeration system has several design features to mitigate the risk of an unsafe off-site

release, which has never occurred at the Berkeley site.

 

WHAT IT SOUNDS LIKE:

A loud wailing noise that slowly alternates between low and high pitch.

It is accompanied by a male voice giving instructions—often incomprehensible, regrettably,

because of sound bounce-back off buildings.

· As required by law, the ammonia siren is tested at noon on the first Wednesday of each month.

 

WHAT TO DO: IF YOU HEAR THIS SIREN AT ANY TIME OTHER THAN NOON ON THE FIRST WEDNESDAY

OF EACH MONTH:

  • TAKE SHELTER INSIDE

  • CLOSE ALL DOORS AND WINDOWS

  • Turn off thermostats if in use

  • If you are outside, move quickly UPWIND

  • STAY INSIDE UNTIL INFORMED THAT IT IS SAFE TO GO OUTDOORS.

 

 

2. Boiler Alarms—Boiler Malfunction Will Not Affect our Berkeley Neighbors

Steam boilers are essential to our manufacturing process.

 

WHAT IT SOUNDS LIKE: : A continuous air horn blast.

· As required by law, Bayer tests the boiler alarms every morning at 8:30

 

WHAT TO DO: No action is required. No one off-site is in danger.

 

3. Fire Alarms—Can Affect Community

Bayer maintains a rigorous safety and emergency response system, with a trained Emergency Response Team

and a fire truck on site in case of emergencies. Our prevention and response systems include fire detection, fire alarms,

and fire suppression systems installed in every building throughout the site, per state and city regulations.

 

WHAT IT SOUNDS LIKE:  On-and-off ringing bell sound, like typical fire alarms.

WHAT TO DO:  In any emergency, visit the City of Berkeley’s website: www.CityofBerkeley.info

 

Bayer Emergency Information Hotline: 1-844-40Bayer (1-844-402-2937).

 

Questions? Contact Jennifer Cogley: jennifer.cogley@bayer.com, 510.705-6965